Infrastructure Finance in the Developing World | G-24

Infrastructure Finance in the Developing World

The Infrastructure Finance in the Developing World Working Paper Series is a joint research effort by the Global Green Growth Institute and the G-24 that explores the challenges and opportunities for scaling up infrastructure finance in emerging markets and developing countries. Each paper addresses a unique piece of the infrastructure finance puzzle and provides critical analysis that will give impetus to international discourse and play a catalytic role in the creation and success of new development finance institutions. The papers have been authored by top experts in their respective fields, and the process has been carefully guided by the leadership of both organizations. This work has important implications in the post-2015 environment, given the essential role infrastructure must play in achieving sustainable development. To this end, GGGI and the G-24 look forward to further development and operationalization of the contents of these papers.

Developing Countries Role in International Tax Cooperation

25th May 2017 Abstract

International tax cooperation has become a high-profile and controversial area in recent years, the product of media scandals about corporate tax avoidance, and disagreements between countries about how best (and perhaps how much) to tackle it. This document sets out brief background on a number of these international tax areas of interest to developing countries, where the G-24 may have a role to play in ensuring that these views are represented in global discussions. It is intended as a scoping document to aid consultations with G-24 members and other stakeholders.


Stemming the Tide of De-Risking through Innovative Technologies and Partnerships

16th August 2016 Abstract


Sovereign Debt of Developing Countries: Overview of Trends and Policy Perspectives

10th May 2016 Abstract

In Chapter 2, Marilou Uy and Shichao Zhou provide an overview of the broadly favorable public debt trends in developing countries over the past decade. They also note that while the increased access to international debt markets provides more opportunities for investments that stimulate growth, it may also bring with it new sources of risk that could seriously affect some sovereign borrowers. The paper also highlights the unique challenges that some groups of countries face in managing sustainable levels of debt. The paper further acknowledges countries’ responsibility in managing their debt but also recognizes that the global community has a role in strengthening the system of sovereign debt resolution. Yet a global consensus on how to move forward on this has been elusive. In this context, the paper documents the evolution of highly divergent views on how to reform the global system for sovereign debt in intergovernmental forums, and the potential approaches that could pave the way for a wider consensus.


Are Credit Rating Agencies Limiting the Operational Capacity of Multilateral Development Banks

30th October 2015 Abstract


Multilateral Lending Instruments for Infrastructure Financing

5th June 2015 Abstract


Challenges and Opportunities for Multilateral Development Banks in 21st Century Infrastructure Finance

5th June 2015 Abstract


National Development Banks and Infrastructure Provision: A Comparative Study of Brazil, China, and South Africa

5th June 2015 Abstract


Involving the Private Sector and Public-Private Partnerships in Financing Investments: Public Opportunities and Challenges

5th June 2015 Abstract


Public Finance Underpinnings for Infrastructure Financing in Developing Countries

5th June 2015 Abstract


The Infrastructure Pipeline and the Need for Robust Project Preparation

5th June 2015 Abstract